RockMelt Builds on Facebook’s Data Portability

An innovative new product has entered the scene that will likely test the resolve of Facebook and others as it relates to data portability.  RockMelt (www.rockmelt.com) is a customized implementation of the open source (Google) Chrome browser that tightly integrates social media while maintaining the comfort (and speed) of the Chrome browsing environment. It . . . → Read More: RockMelt Builds on Facebook’s Data Portability

Why downloading your data is not data portability

Alisa Leonard who is the communications chairperson of the DataPortability Project, has written a perspective that adds to the one just posted by the current vice-chair of the organisation.

She writes:

Already I have seen across the Twittersphere references to Facebook now allowing “data portability.” Data portability is the idea that users are, and . . . → Read More: Why downloading your data is not data portability

A step in the right direction, says vice-chair of the DataPortability Project

Today’s announcement from Facebook represents the most important statement from them to-date regarding Data Portability. But to be clear, it is by no means the ultimate solution we all seek. Still, it represents major movement in the right direction.

First, you literally can draw a line on the calendar and say “prior to this . . . → Read More: A step in the right direction, says vice-chair of the DataPortability Project

Announcing the Portability Policy

Announcing PortabilityPolicy.org, an initiative of the DataPortability Project . . . → Read More: Announcing the Portability Policy

Deleting Your Account: Data portability policy questions for a graceful exit

PortabilityPolicy logoCameron Chapman explains How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites. Perhaps your site’s Portability Policy should answer these questions:

How?

  • If you don’t allow account deletion, why?
  • What steps do you take to prevent someone else from deleting my account?
  • What steps do you take to prevent me from deleting my account when I might regret it? (a moment of anger, intoxicated confusion, suffering from dreadful lack of coordination
  • Do you distinguish between account deletion and deactivation?
  • How long will it take for my account to be invisible to others?
  • How long before my account is gone forever?
  • If I delete my account, can others claim my username?
  • If I delete my account, will I be able to use my email address to create a new account?
  • What happens if I don’t have access to the email address I used to start the account?
  • What can delay account closure? (For example, pending financial transactions?)
  • Where is the procedure for deleting my account? What happens after I make the request?

Completeness

  • Where is the list of authorized software/services that might log into my account? (So I can turn them off.)
  • If you let me log into other sites with your credentials (“Sign in with your X account”), what happens to my accounts on the other sites? Where is the list of sites where I use your credentials to login?
  • When you delete my profile and account, what happens to shared/community content, like my contributions to a wiki page or to a threaded conversation or gifts to another person?
  • When I delete my account, do you also cancel subscriptions to any related premium services?
  • Do you make downloading and saving my assets (photos, contacts, history, etc.) part of the account deletion process?
  • When I delete my account, do you also delete my contributions (like videos on YouTube) or should I delete those before requesting account deletion?
  • If I have money or credit balances in my account, what happens to that money when I delete my account?
  • What do you do to help reduce search engine caching of and links to my deleted profile and resources?
  • What do you do with my answer to “Why do you want to delete your account?”

Continue reading Deleting Your Account: Data portability policy questions for a graceful exit

Check out #OExchange, a data portability protocol

New: “OExchange is an open protocol for sharing any URL with any service on the web.” . . . → Read More: Check out #OExchange, a data portability protocol

Chris Saad questions Mark Zuckerberg

Chris Saad wrote an important post that appeared on the ReadWriteWeb Blog yesterday. I recommend you read it to get a better understanding of Facebook’s privacy moves in relation to Data Portability.

In it, he raises a key point about the tendancy for Facebook, as well as other large companies, to manipulate industry language . . . → Read More: Chris Saad questions Mark Zuckerberg

Data portability in the Credit Card industry

Credit card data portability . . . → Read More: Data portability in the Credit Card industry

Facebook Embraces Data Portability – Again

Facebook issues strongest endorsement of Data Portability yet, saying the people own their own data. . . . → Read More: Facebook Embraces Data Portability – Again

Facebook claims data portability is criminal

Facebook believes it’s criminal to reuse your data with your permission . . . → Read More: Facebook claims data portability is criminal