App.net commits to data portability as a brand promise

App.net, the we’re-supported-by-our-users-not-by-advertisers twitter alternative, promises data portability to its uses. Let’s look at their core values.

We are selling our product, NOT our users.

We will never sell your personal data, content, feed, interests, clicks, or anything else to advertisers. We promise.

On the one hand, no selling your explicit, inferred or . . . → Read More: App.net commits to data portability as a brand promise

Data Portability Wars : Google and Facebook vs. YOU

Well, here we go again.

The big companies love to embrace data portability and the freedom it provides its users, not to mention the press and goodwill that comes with it, as long as it doesn’t conflict with their corporate agenda.

Let’s call it what it is: Facebook and Google both support “convenient” data . . . → Read More: Data Portability Wars : Google and Facebook vs. YOU

#portability4trust: How we will bring data portability to trust frameworks this quarter.

Dial or Skype details for this Wednesday’s Conference Call to start before IIW.

Here’s how you can bring the ideas in our data portability policy to hundreds of millions of people. I’ll need your help in May and June to start. In short: build portability principles into boilerplate identity contracts.

What’s a trust framework? . . . → Read More: #portability4trust: How we will bring data portability to trust frameworks this quarter.

NYT: Companies should give usage data to customers

There’s data I create explicitly, like typing my name or dialing a phone number. Then there’s data I create as a byproduct of my using a product. Economist Richard H. Thaler writes in the New York Times that companies should share usage data with their customers. “Show Us the Data. (It’s Ours, . . . → Read More: NYT: Companies should give usage data to customers

Why Yahoo! Contributor Network Needs a DataPortability Policy

YCN is a creative content distribution point to various Yahoo! properties. Photographer Thomas Hawk can’t imagine losing access to or control over his photos in the Yahoo Contributor Network. The Contributor TOS says they can kick him off any time for any reason without notice or recourse. Thomas is angry because he’s seen Yahoo!’s . . . → Read More: Why Yahoo! Contributor Network Needs a DataPortability Policy

Deleting Your Account: Data portability policy questions for a graceful exit

PortabilityPolicy logoCameron Chapman explains How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites. Perhaps your site’s Portability Policy should answer these questions:

How?

  • If you don’t allow account deletion, why?
  • What steps do you take to prevent someone else from deleting my account?
  • What steps do you take to prevent me from deleting my account when I might regret it? (a moment of anger, intoxicated confusion, suffering from dreadful lack of coordination
  • Do you distinguish between account deletion and deactivation?
  • How long will it take for my account to be invisible to others?
  • How long before my account is gone forever?
  • If I delete my account, can others claim my username?
  • If I delete my account, will I be able to use my email address to create a new account?
  • What happens if I don’t have access to the email address I used to start the account?
  • What can delay account closure? (For example, pending financial transactions?)
  • Where is the procedure for deleting my account? What happens after I make the request?

Completeness

  • Where is the list of authorized software/services that might log into my account? (So I can turn them off.)
  • If you let me log into other sites with your credentials (“Sign in with your X account”), what happens to my accounts on the other sites? Where is the list of sites where I use your credentials to login?
  • When you delete my profile and account, what happens to shared/community content, like my contributions to a wiki page or to a threaded conversation or gifts to another person?
  • When I delete my account, do you also cancel subscriptions to any related premium services?
  • Do you make downloading and saving my assets (photos, contacts, history, etc.) part of the account deletion process?
  • When I delete my account, do you also delete my contributions (like videos on YouTube) or should I delete those before requesting account deletion?
  • If I have money or credit balances in my account, what happens to that money when I delete my account?
  • What do you do to help reduce search engine caching of and links to my deleted profile and resources?
  • What do you do with my answer to “Why do you want to delete your account?”

Continue reading Deleting Your Account: Data portability policy questions for a graceful exit

Facebook Embraces Data Portability – Again

Facebook issues strongest endorsement of Data Portability yet, saying the people own their own data. . . . → Read More: Facebook Embraces Data Portability – Again

Graceful Exit: The Power to Fight Eviction

Online Eviction

Jason Scott’s Protection From Online Eviction? and his follow up post make the argument that services like AOL, MySpace, flickr, or Skype should be treated like landlords.

The power landlords have over tenants is overwhelming, unless restricted by law. The argument: if they want to shut down a service, essentially evicting users, . . . → Read More: Graceful Exit: The Power to Fight Eviction